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Duration:08:10
Uploaded:2020-08-19
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[Sexplanations intro]

I don't like everyone. I don't feel good all the time. I poop, I cry, I get lonely — I'm as human as the rest of you, which means that sometimes I need to just cool it and scroll through pretty things on the internet. Pretty things and clickbait fact lists. Did you know that strawberries aren't berries, they're actually a part of the rose family?

Anyway. I go through these lists, and when I come across a sexuality-related fact, I think: "I have to learn more, see if it's real, suss out the details and then tell people!" So here we are. Nine random sex facts—tripled checked and corrected if they're off—originally published by Fact Republic.

One: The split gill mushroom has over 23,328 distinct sexes, but they can't all successfully mate with one another. Each sex can only be fertile with 22,960 other sexes. Sure enough, John Raper published these findings in his text Genetics of Sexuality in Higher Fungi. The genome of the split gill mushroom was sequenced in 2010, and an article about the genetics was published in Nature Biotechnology the same year. Let me just say that if we were like this mushroom, and wanted to reproduce, it would mean we could mate with 98.4% of people! It wouldn't be complex sex, just fraternism, or bumping each other, but 98.4%! Compared to some people who struggle to find a single partner, ahhhhh....mmmmm...!

Fact 2: The University of Oregon's "O" hand sign is equivalent in American Sign Language to screaming "vagina." Kind of.