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Uploaded:2015-02-19
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SciShow's Hank Green on the vlogbrothers' beginnings and the new age of content creation in a YouTube-dominated world.

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Hank: I'm Hank Green. I make videos for the internet. Mostly educational, informational, sometimes not.

"Alright, today I'm going to give it to you straight about climate change.
Electromagnetism is the most common force in our daily lives.
Most of the epigenetic information from a parent is stripped off of the embryo's genome in the first few days."

My brother and I started in 2007. It was his idea. He was super into it and convinced me that it was important and amazing before it was important and amazing. There was no way to make money, no one even thought about the fact that it could be a business. I just... because there was this opportunity to, like, break down the distribution wall and be like, everybody can make content now, I felt like I had to do it, it was like, this is a thing now. YouTube is an amazing thing.

"Steve Grove: Hank Green of the Vlogbrothers.

Obama: Hey. Great to see you Hank.

Hank: President Obama.

Obama: Thank you so much for having me.

Hank: Thanks a lot for doing this.

Obama: It's cool.

Hank: I don't really feel like I'm having you. This is your house.

Obama: You know, well, it's the people's house."

Hank: A lot of people, and mostly people under 25, are getting a majority of their content online now. And a huge piece of that is YouTube. And probably the biggest piece of it. It's an amazing platform to connect, and also it's sort of- it allows for such a broader diversity of the kind of content that can be created because there's no limitation on how much content can be uploaded, there's no- like TV has a specific stream and to get a channel is very hard, to get a YouTube channel, it's literally sometimes hard not to have one.

"Like, for no real reason, they’re just supposed to like, waddle around on moss and suck up water, that’s their job, and yet, in their dormant state, they can withstand temperatures close to absolute zero and up to 300 degrees Fahrenheit."

The combination of all of these young people being excited about consuming that content, and also, like, suddenly having the ability to create it themselves, like, all you need is a smartphone. We are at this really exciting moment where no one knows what's going to happen. And like accepting that, and also accepting that like there is not a direct analogy with television, it's like, it's every bit as different as going from radio to movies, this to me feels, when we're going from TV to online video. It's so cool and so exciting to be a part of.