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WHEREIN I talk to Dr. Aaron Carroll about Healthcare Triage, the channel where he tackles contemporary issues in health! Part two here: http://youtu.be/8uTp00CRgjw

Full audio of the interview: goverbanoun.com/IntAudio/AaronAudio.mp3

The Incidental Economist -- http://theincidentaleconomist.com/
Healthcare Triage -- http://www.youtube.com/healthcaretriage

If you like what you see, consider throwing some coinage at me through Patreon! -- http://www.patreon.com/goVERBaNOUN
Hi. I'm Peter... and this is Go Verb a Noun.

Today we're talking to Dr. Aaron Carroll from Healthcare Triage. What Dr. Carroll does is he basically demystifies healthcare issues. Anything from vaccines to whether or not sugar makes kids hyper. In a word- or in several words, he makes medicine and science accessible for people like you and me who aren't actually doctors, which I think is great.

In this first part of the interview, he is going to be talking to us about Healthcare Triage specifically, issues that the channel has faced, what it's been like doing the channel as somebody who comes from an academic perspective.

In the second part of the interview, even though he is an insider at this point, I mean he hosts Healthcare Triage, Dr. Carroll is going to give us the point of view of somebody who is, in a way, an outsider to the community. Which is really cool. And he is also going to talk to us about some of the importance of science communication. So, if this appeals to you, stick around! Now, let's get this show on the road. Okay.

My name is Aaron Carroll. What I do is- oh god, I mean it's like there's- do you want like everything?

My name is Arron Carroll. I am a pediatrician and a health services researcher. And, ah, that means besides going to medical school and becoming a pediatrician, I then did a fellowship and extra work and got a master's degree to also do health services research.

I spend a fairly large amount of time doing actual research, we do a lot of work with how people make decisions, we do a lot of work in looking at how we can use health information technology to improve how we care for kids, and we do a decent amount of work in health policy related areas as well. I am also an associate dean for research mentoring here at the Indiana University School of Medicine, so I, um try to help a lot of the junior faculty improve their mentorship so they can become better independent investigators as well. I do a lot of writing about health policy. We have pretty well-read bog, The Incidental Economist. I also write these days for the New York Times, at the Upshot on areas of health research and health policy. And I also have a show on YouTube, which is really why you're talking to me, uh, called Healthcare Triage, where we do very much the same thing with a lot of my writing, we talk about issues that are important for health and for health research and for health policy.

How did you get started with Healthcare Triage?

So... about a year ago almost exactly now, I was on Twitter one night, and someone tweeted at me that they had seen, oh look, John Green did a video using, you know, stuff from Aaron Carroll, two great, you know, two people he liked or whatever coming together and how exciting that was, and I was like, I have no idea what this is, what's he talking about, and I clicked though and I watched and it was John's Vlogbrothers video, on what makes the United States healthcare system cost so hard. Ah, cost so much. And a few minutes later John actually tweeted at me and said like, oh my god, I didn't know you were in Indiana, could we meet. And I was like, I'd be happy to. And so, you know, a lot of the stuff I think he'd taken from that post, he had read or used from our blog, with attribution, I mean it was all, it wasn't stolen or anything. (3:08