YouTube: https://youtube.com/watch?v=VFwYGFt5q90
Previous: The Bayes Theorem: What Are the Odds?
Next: The Healthcare System of France

Categories

Statistics

View count:1,089,858
Likes:20,376
Dislikes:630
Comments:4,515
Duration:05:48
Uploaded:2014-04-19
Last sync:2018-11-14 21:00
There's just no way to talk about marijuana without someone completely misinterpreting what I say. Some of you are going to call me a fascist for saying anything bad about pot. Others are going to attack me for not coming down on it hard enough. But the truth of the matter is that many things that are far more dangerous than pot are totally legal in this country. That's not my opinion, it's what scientific studies show us. No one is saying marijuana is totally safe. But is it so bad for you that it should be illegal, even though it has benefits? Watch and decide. Happy weed day.

Those of you who want to read more and see references can go here: http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wordpress/?p=54913

And, yes, we do know about the new study on brain development, which came out long after we taped. But as with a lot of research, it's being totally misinterpreted by the media. Go check out the references to see a nice article where the author of the study says the same thing.

John Green -- Executive Producer
Stan Muller -- Director, Producer
Aaron Carroll -- Writer
Mark Olsen -- Graphics

http://www.twitter.com/aaronecarroll
http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan
http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen
http://www.twitter.com/olsenvideo
It's April twentieth! The twentieth of April. It's 4 20 or as some like to call it, weed day. I guess we're doing this. This is healthcare triage.

To be honest, this is an episode I thought about bailing on many times. There's just no way to talk about marijuana without someone completely misinterpreting what I say. Some of you are going to call me a fascist for saying anything bad about pot at all. Others are going to attack me for not coming down on it hard enough.

So I'm going to cloak myself, as I always do, in the power of data. Marijuana works by effecting the brain. It's a drug, like many others, with different effects on different people. It's active ingredient is tetrahydrocannabinol or THC. THC bonds to protein specific receptors in the brain to produce a number of results. 

It can have a mild sedative effect and it can also lower your inhibitions. Marijuana can increase your pulse, lower your blood pressure, and increase your appetite. It can also interfere with short term memory, lower your reaction time, and make you unsteady on your feet. 

But so can lots of other things that we like to eat. drink, or smoke. The real question is weather it is dangerous enough to be made illegal. And that's wear the screaming usually starts. 

There's no evidence that marijuana causes a physical dependency like heroin does. Some argue though, that it can become psychologically addictive. Some will argue that the smoke is carcinogenic and causes lung cancer or respiratory disease. Others argue that regular use can effect the immune system. Still more argue that it increases the chance of developing a psychotic illness. But as I point out again and again in many of these videos, lots of things have both a benefit and a harm. 

No one should be under the Illusion that marijuana has no harms. The question we should be concerned about is how much harm is there in marijuana and does that harm outweigh the benefit so much that it should be made illegal? 

And now the benefits. There's a growing body of evidence that marijuana has use in many medical conditions to improve quality of life. And you need only to talk to one of the gazillion marijuana users out there to hear about its other benefits as well. 

Moreover, there are lots of things in the world that can absolutely harm us that are totally legal. The two most obvious choices are tobacco and alcohol. Both of these substances are regulated but legal in most of the world. They can provide us with a useful benchmark against which we can compare marijuana. Don't blame the messenger, I'm just telling you what the science says. 

To the research! Two years ago a study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association investigating the effects of marijuana and tobacco on pulmonary function. Researchers followed a cohort of more than 5000 men and women for over 20 years, they wanted to see how smoking tobacco and marijuana affected lung health.

What did they find? Not surprisingly tobacco use had significant negative effects on lung function. Marijuana use though had none. No lung effects at all. They couldn't even show that very high use of marijuana was bad for lung function, although the study wasn't powered for that specific analysis. Their conclusions and I quote from the Journal of the American Medical Association "marijuana may have beneficial effects on pain control, appetite, mood, and management of other chronic symptoms. Our findings suggest that occasional use of marijuana for these or other purposes may not be associated with adverse consequences on pulmonary function." Tobacco totally does have adverse consequences on pulmonary function.

Almost in the same week the CDC published a report on binge drinking in adults in the United States. The results were sort of shocking. More than one in six adults in the United States is a binge drinker of alcohol. Those that do binge drink do more than 4 times a month, and when they do, they have about 8 drinks on average. More than 28% of binge drinkers were young adults, 18-24 years old, who had more than 9 drinks on average when binging. But elderly binge drinkers were those older than 65 drank the most often, about 5 and a half times per month. 

Excessive alcohol use accounted for an estimated 80 thousand deaths in every year of the study. The estimated economic cost of this damage's was more than two hundred and twenty three billion dollars in 2006 alone. 

Another study was published in 1990, that described a cohort of more than 45,000 Swedes that were followed for 15 years, there was no increase in mortality in those marijuana after controlling for other factors. 

Another study was published in 1997 in The American Journal of Public Health that followed more than 65,000 people in the US aged 15-49 years old. They found that marijuana use had no effect at on on mortality in women, and no effect on non-AIDS mortality in men either. 

So let's review. Tobacco? Adversely impacts lung function and perfectly legal. Binge drinking of alcohol? Common, dangerous, costly to society, also totally legal. Marijuana? No impact on lung function, no impact on mortality, almost always illegal. 

I'm not arguing that marijuana should be sold in the aisles of drug stores or supermarkets. But here and in many other parts of the world, ya need a good reason to make something illegal. There are lots of things that are dangerous but regulated. We don't let kids buy tobacco or alcohol; totally makes sense. The same should apply to marijuana.

We don't let people drive under the influence of alcohol, totally makes sense, the same should apply to marijuana which has been shown to impair drivers significantly as well. There was even a meta-analysis published in the BMJ in 2011 confirming that, and I believe the results.

But it's hard to continue to make the argument that the freedom that we enjoy should cover tobacco and alcohol yet not extend to marijuana. There is plenty of evidence that the former are unhealthy and are consumed at our own risk. The evidence against marijuana is thin.