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Duration:01:52
Uploaded:2020-09-28
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Ashley Keyser reads her poem, “Ant in Amber”.

Ashley:
https://www.ashleykeyser.com/

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Hi I'm Ashley Keyser and I'll be reading my poem Ant in Amber.
If you ever come across a piece of amber you can rub it on your sweater and it will pick up a static electric charge.
For me for awhile, the thought of an ant trapped inside amber was a charged image and I didn't know why so I wrote this poem about it.

 NewSection (0:28)


Ant in Amber

Electric ember
can't remember the sap, the honey-
slow burble I suck

avidly. Double be, hundred me,
I'd bear my likeness
as I bear this

memory—wood, resin, river
silt. Slept
a century safe-kept, mated

by a heat that froze
my mandibles. They clasp
a light made glass.

Tiger-iris, me the pupil
learning history
is density. Bride, bare

your throat. You palaces
burning at the bottom of the sea,
fathom me.