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The next entry in our parade of heroes is Rama, the protagonist of the Ramayana, one of India’s oldest stories. We’re going to be talking about Rama’s importance to Hindu culture, and how Rama fits into Campbell’s idea of the Hero’s Journey. Although, Rama may not even be the hero.

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Hi, I'm Mike Rugnetta, this is CrashCourse Mythology, and today we continue our discussion of heroes and heroism. This time, we're looking at the hero king Rama, whose story is told in one of the core texts of the Hindu tradition.

That's right! We're discussing a living religious tradition. Thoth and I would like to remind you that we will be focusing on the narrative and cultural aspects of Rama's story, rather than its religious meaning or potential historical truth.

Also, a quick note on pronunciation: There aren't any Sanskrit scholars around Crash Course HQ, so we're gonna do our best, but I can guarantee that I'm not gonna be perfect. We've put the sources that we've used for pronunciation in the dooblydoo, if you're curious how we arrived at what I'm attempting to say. Thank you in advance for all of your kind and helpful comments.
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