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Looking for Alaska

Looking for Alaska is a book about the teenager Miles "Pudge" Halter, who is obsessed with last words and decides to leave to a boarding school his father had attended in order to "seek a great perhaps". At the new school, Culver Creek, he makes a few valuable friends including one girl that he falls in love with, Alaska Young. The story revolves around his trying to figure out her complicated life.


He is given the nickname "Pudge" by his roommate Chip "the Colonel". 


Alaska changes Miles life, practically escorts him to his long-awaited "Great Perhaps". She gets him into drinking and smoking and together with the Colonel they pull a few major pranks.


But then she makes her way out of the "Labyrinth of Suffering" which leaves many unanswered questions. Pudge and the Colonel are now left to figure out the mystery that is Alaska Young.


Though this book is not as popular as John Green's "The fault in our stars", Looking For Alaska is well known for it's "drizzle-and-hurricane"-metaphor on social media.


It's the first book that John Green wrote and won the Michael L. Printz Award.
The book shows religious and symbolic content and confronts the reader with a few ethical questions.


Quotes:


"Imagining the future is a kind of nostalgia" - Alaska
"I may die young, but at least I'll die smart" - Alaska
"You never get me. That's the whole point." - Alaska
"Y'all smoke to enjoy it. I smoke to die." - Alaska
"We all use the future to escape the presence." - Alaska
"What you must understand about me is that I'm a deeply unhappy person" - Alaska


"I know so many last words. But I will never know hers." - Miles
"You can't just make yourself matter and then die." - Miles
"If people were rain, I was drizzle and she was a hurricane." - Miles
"We need never be hopeless because we can never be irreparably broken." - Miles


Last words:


"I go to seek a great perhaps" - François Rabelais
"It's very beautiful over there" - Thomas Edison
"Damn it. How will I ever get out of this labyrinth!" - Gabriel Garcia Márquez The General in His Labyrinth

2016 Jul 16 217.x.x.230 Looking for Alaska (2432 characters)
2016 Jul 16 217.x.x.230 Looking for Alaska (2453 characters)
2016 Jul 16 217.x.x.230 Looking for Alaska (1323 characters)
2016 Jul 16 217.x.x.230 Looking for Alaska (1214 characters)
2016 Jul 16 217.x.x.230 Looking for Alaska (1058 characters)
2014 Jun 30 50.x.x.157 Looking for Alaska (939 characters)
2014 May 15 MustIHaveAUsername Looking for Alaska (972 characters)
2014 Feb 04 205.x.x.40 Looking for Alaska (719 characters)
2014 Jan 11 82.x.x.161 Looking for Alaska (707 characters)
2013 Jul 23 OMNICTIONARIAN96 Looking for Alaska (682 characters)

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